Testrepository roadmap 2015/16

Testrepository has been moderately successful – its very good at some of the things it aspired to (e.g. debugging sporadic test failures in parallel environments), but other angles have not really been explored.

I’ve set some time aside to correct this, in large part to facilitate some important features for tempest (which has its concurrency currently built on the meta-runner included in testrepository – and I’d like to enable the tempest authors to avoid having to write gnarly concurrency code :))

So my plan is to tackle a few things in the lead up to, and perhaps just after the Tokyo OpenStack summit. I wanted to socialise the proposed changes though, and thus this blog post.

Profiles

Firstly, a long standing issue is that when one tests several different configurations, testrepository is poor at reporting failures that are configuration specific. For instance, imagine that your test suite is run with both Python 2.7 and 3.4, and both results are loaded into your repository. If a given test ‘X’ fails in the first run, and not the second… after the second run is loaded, it will be reported as ‘passing’.

My proposed fix for this is to call the name of each such run a ‘profile’ and use tags to differentiate between the two runs. So you’d tag the 2.7 run perhaps ‘py27’ and the second ‘py34’, and then tell testrepository that the ‘py27’ and ‘py34’ tags are being used to identify profiles. After that testrepository will only consider two test to apply to the same test if the tags match. Tags that are not specified as being for profiles (e.g. the worker-N tags that the testrepository runner adds to track backends that tests run in) won’t be considered in that comparison. This well then allow testrepository to track that each run was separate and the results are not meant to replace each other. The use of tags allows for test matrices too, in principle– consider python version as one dimension, operating system version as another, and database engine as a third — it would be up to the user. I don’t plan to directly implement a matrix system in the first iteration. A different, more dynamic model is in principle possible: don’t tag things, just log events that will give clues and correlate later – thats not precluded by this tag based approach, and we can always add such a thing later.

The output for the queries of the datastore need to be updated though – we don’t currently report tags in e.g. ‘testr failing –list’. This is a little tricky: the listing format is intended to be a mix of nice-for-humans, and machine consumption. Another approach we considered was to namespace the tests with the profile. This has a couple of disadvantages: it may break an unknown number of deployments if the chosen separator is already in use by people, and secondly, it mixes structured and free-form data in a lossy way. One example of that would be that we’d start interpreting all test ids to see if they are – or are not – namespaced with a profile : thats likely to be fragile, at best. On the other hand it would very easily fit into the list format – which is why it was appealing. On balance though, the fragility and conflation would just add technical debt. Instead, we’ll do the following:

  1. Anything that needs to output a flat list of tests will output that for just one profile. An option will be added to allow querying the profiles for which results might be given. The default will start erroring with a list of available profiles if more than one profile has been specified.
  2. We’ll define a minimal JSON schema for reporting multiple profiles in such places. The excellent jq tool can be used to manipulate that in shell command lines. A command line option will opt into receiving this.

Testrepository has two very related programs inside itself. There is the data store and the various queries it can do – e.g. ‘testr load’ and ‘testr failing’. Then there is the meta-runner, which knows how to run some test processes to execute tests. While strictly speaking this is optional, its been very convenient for working with Python tests to have the meta-runner connected to testr and able to do in-process querying.

The meta-runner will benefit from being updated as well. My intent is to make it capable of running all the tests from all the profiles the user specifies, storing that as one single run in the datastore. Two commands in particular need to change here – `testr list-tests` needs to change in line with the test listing above, and `testr run –load-list` needs to be taught how to deal with multiple profiles. I plan to add a command line option to tell it that JSON is being used, and to select tests across all profiles when a simple list or a test regex is given. Finally the command line can benefit from a command line option to select one or more profiles.

Scheduling

The meta-runner has a crude scheduler – it balances based on historic performance prior to running any backend. An online scheduler will give much greater performance in both unseeded, and skewed data cases- e.g.if many long tests fail due to a bug the run after that will often have some workers finishing well before others – leading to slow test times.

The plan here is to finish the implementation of bidirectional channels to test backends, and then dispatch work to them incrementally

Concurrency plans

Tempest wants to be able to run some tests completely independently, and then others can run together arbitrarily. To facilitate this, the online scheduler will be extended to permit describing an overall plan to run through – e.g. a list of segments, where each segment describes one or more tests that can be run together. The UI to supply that to the scheduler will probably start out as a JSON file listing exact test ids and we can iterate from there based on their experience.

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