Strength training from home

For the last year I’ve been incrementally moving away from lifting static weights and towards body weight based exercises, or callisthenics. I’ve been doing this for a number of reasons, including better avoidance of injury (if I collapse, the entire stack is dynamic, if a bar held above my head drops on me, most of the weight is just dead weight – ouch), accessibility during travel – most hotel gyms are very poor, and functional relevance – I literally never need to put 100 kg on my back, but I do climb stairs, for instance.

Covid-19 shutting down the gym where I train is a mild inconvenience for me as a result, because even though I don’t do it, I am able to do nearly all my workouts entirely from home. And I thought a post about this approach might be of interest to other folk newly separated from their training facilities.

I’ve gotten most of my information from a few different youtube channels:

There are many more channels out there, and I encourage you to go and look and read and find out what works for you. Those 5 are my greatest hits, if you will. I’ve bought the FitnessFAQs exercise programs to help me with my my training, and they are indeed very effective.

While you don’t need a gymnasium, you do need some equipment, particularly if you can’t go and use a local park. Exactly what you need will depend on what you choose to do – for instance, doing dips on the edge of a chair can avoid needing any equipment, but doing them with some portable parallel bars can be much easier. Similarly, doing pull ups on the edge of a door frame is doable, but doing them with a pull-up bar is much nicer on your fingers.

Depending on your existing strength you may not need bands, but I certainly did. Buying rings is optional – I love them, but they aren’t needed to have a good solid workout.

I bought parallettes for working on the planche.undefined Parallel bars for dips and rows.undefined A pull-up bar for pull-ups and chin-ups, though with the rings you can add flys, rows, face-pulls, unstable push-ups and more. The rings. And a set of 3 bands that combine for 7 different support amounts.undefinedundefined

In terms of routine, I do a upper/lower split, with 3 days on upper body, one day off, one day on lower, and the weekends off entirely. I was doing 2 days on lower body, but found I was over-training with Aikido later that same day.

On upper body days I’ll do (roughly) chin ups or pull ups, push ups, rows, dips, hollow body and arch body holds, handstands and some grip work. Today, as I write this on Sunday evening, 2 days after my last training day on Friday, I can still feel my lats and biceps from training Friday afternoon. Zero issue keeping the intensity up.

For lower body, I’ll do pistol squats, nordic drops, quad extensions, wall sits, single leg calf raises, bent leg calf raises. Again, zero issues hitting enough intensity to achieve growth / strength increases. The only issue at home is having a stable enough step to get a good heel drop for the calf raises.

If you haven’t done bodyweight training at all before, when starting, don’t assume it will be easy – even if you’re a gym junkie, our bodies are surprisingly heavy, and there’s a lot of resistance just moving them around.

Good luck, train well!